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Ask Farnoosh about money, work, life, or a recent guest below and she'll do her best to answer your question during an upcoming Friday episode on So Money. Record a message below or type in your question.
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Ted Gonder, Co-Founding CEO of Moneythink

I’m a big believer in never underestimating a child’s ability to learn about money at an early age.  Researchers at Cambridge University discovered that kids can learn and take on good money habits by the age of 7. Meantime, a new study by Acorns, the micro-investing app, found that nearly two out of every five millennials say they feel anxious when thinking about daily expenses, especially debt. And more than half surveyed felt their formal schooling left them ill-prepared for success.

Today’s guest is working to give young adults a better chance at managing their money well. Ted Gonder is the co-founding CEO of Moneythink, a national technology non-profit that helps young adults – particularly first-generation college students – build financial health through mentorship programs and mobile apps. It first launched in 2009 and since then has trained over 1,500 college leaders to serve as financial mentors and role models to over 12,000 teens across 17 states. In 2015, Ted was recognized for his work by being named to Forbes’ 30 Under 30 list as the youngest in the finance category. He also served as the youngest appointee on the U.S. President’s Council for Financial Capability for Young Americans under Obama. He’s a big underachiever…Just kidding.

If you’d like to learn more about Ted visit www.tedgonder.com or follow him on Twitter @tedgonder. Also, Moneythink recently released their College Success report highlighting the financial barriers to success that students from low-income backgrounds face.

One of my favorite quotes from the interview: “Treat your life like an entrepreneurial venture & every decision you make as if it’s an investment in your future.” – Click To Tweet

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